USC and National Archives of the Philippines team up in new volume on Cebu records

Records pervade every facet of Cebu’s colonial experience. They provide confirmation of what has become known even as they affected how events would turn out.  A new book, INTEGRACIÓN / INTERNACIÓN: The Urbanization of Cebu in Archival Records of the Spanish Colonial Period, contains essays from six writers including eminent historians, Resil Mojares and Michael Cullinane. The book was formally launched last November 14, 2017 at the Ayala Center Cebu Activity Center.

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These essays all deal with diverse aspects of the Spanish Colonial urbanization of Cebu gleaned from materials in the National Archives of the Philippines and other sources. There are hardly any records in the National Archives from the early years of the Spanish Period in the Cebu areas. But later maps and charts provide evidence of attempts to review the islands and resolve prominent features.

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Through trial and error, coves and coasts took shape on paper. The colonizers were getting to know the land and seas.This volume is a product of a affiliation between the University of San Carlos in Cebu and the National Archives of the Philippines. This is part of a planned series which started with Concripcion: Imagining and Inscribing the Ilocano World which came out in 2014. In keeping with the earlier work, this book also serves as a Catalogue and Dossier documenting an exposition of the same name which opened in the University of San Carlos Museum on 13 November 2013 and in the Museo Sugbo on 23 October 2014.

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The volume is edited by two country’s distinguished names in the fields of anthropology and sociology, J. Eleazar Bersales and Ino Manalo. Necessary to the governance of the Spanish colonial empire was the barter of letters. By virtue of orders penned on paper, distant belongings were administered by absent monarchs through their satraps. With letters, reports, edicts, charts, and plans, colonizers were placing their stomp on their possessions. Societies were being introduced to new environments wanting new behavior, new ways of existing.

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There are hardly any records in the National Archives from the early years of the Spanish period in the Cebu area. But later maps and charts provide evidence of attempts to survey the islands and settle on salient features. As the land became more familiar, the road and rail network for colonization was set up— mostly in the 19th century. Streets were laid out, often in grid with right anglesThere were stages when Cebu’s waned, such as when the capital was moved to Manila. But there were also times when the Cebuanos interpolated imposing designs and narratives.Records permeated every aspect of Cebu’s colonial experience. They provide evidence of what transpired even as they affected how events would turn out.

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Resil B. Mojares is Professor Emeritus at the University of San Carlos. He earned his Ph.D. in Literature from the University of the Philippines-Diliman and has authored books in the Philippine history and culture. He had stints as visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Hawaii, University of California at Los Angeles, Kyoto University, and National University of Singapore. His most recent book is Interrogations in Philippine Cultural History from Ateneo de Manila University Press.
Michael M. Cullinane is the Assiociate Director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Faculty Associate in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He obtained his Ph.D. in Southeast Asian history at the university of Michigan. He has most recently been affiliated with the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of San Carlos. His most recent book is The Battle for Cebu: Andrew S. Rowan and the Siege of Sudlon (1899-1900) from the USC Press.
Danilo M. Gerona holds a Ph.D. in Philippine Studies from the University of the Philippines. Specializing in the early Spanish colonial era in the Philippines, he did extensive research in both Philippine and Spanish archives. As author of the book , Ferdinand Magellan Armada de Maluco and the European Discovery of the Philippines, he sits the Comite International of the Fundacion Civiliter Sevilla 2019-2022, a global committee based in the city of Seville which spearheads the 5th centennial celebration of the Magellan expedition’s circumnavigation of the world.
Trizer Dale D. Mansueto is involved in researches, museums, and translations. He has authored and co-authored books and articles on culture and history topics. He obtained his Master of Arts in history degree from Siliman University.
Eleazar R. Bersales is concurrently the Head Curator of the University of San Carlos Museum and Manager of USC Press. He is associate professor at the USC Department of Anthropology, Sociology, and History. He obtained his Ph.D. in Anthropology degree from the University of San Carlos (under a joint educational partnership program in archaeology with New Mexico State University) and an M.A. in Philippine Studies from the University of the Philippines-Diliman. Jobers, as he is known in Cebu, has edited, authored or co-authored a number of books on culture and heritage and also writes a weekly column in the Cebu Daily News entitled “Past Forward.”
Ino Manalo, who is also known as Victorio Mapa Manalo, has been Executive Director of the National Archive of the Philippines since 2011. He is a writer who has won national prizes like the Don Carlos Palanca Award for Literature. He holds a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University, and a Post Graduate Certificate for Archival Studies from Hongkong University. He is a former Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Manila.
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